English Department Course Outlines

English 8

Burnaby School District English 8 Course Outline
Source: English Language Arts Integrated Resource Package 2007

The English Language Arts 8 – 12 curriculum provides students with opportunities to experience the power of language by dealing with a range of texts and with the full range of contexts and purposes associated with the use of language. The Integrated Resource Package (IRP) and the Prescribed Learning Outcomes (PLOs) developed by the Ministry of Education include the same principles that guide our classroom instruction:

  • Learning requires the active participation of the student.
    • People learn in a variety of ways and at different rates.
    • Learning is both an individual and a group process.
    • Learning is most effective when students reflect on the process of learning and
    setting goals for improvement

PRESCRIBED LEARNING OUTCOMES
Oral Language (Speaking/Listening)

English 8 students will be able to:

  • interact and collaborate in pairs and groups
    • express ideas and information in a variety of situations and forms
    •  listen to comprehend, interpret, and evaluate ideas and information from a variety of texts
    •  select and use a range of strategies to interact and collaborate with others in pairs and groups
    • select and use a range of strategies to prepare oral communications
    • select and use a range of strategies to express ideas and information in oral communications
    • use listening strategies to understand, recall, and analyse a variety of texts
    • speak and listen to make personal responses to texts
    • speak and listen to interpret and analyze ideas and information from texts
    • speak and listen to synthesize and extend thinking
    • use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their speaking and listening
    • recognize and apply the structures and features of oral language to convey and derive meaning

Reading and Viewing

English 8 students will be able to:

  • read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of literary texts
    • read, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of information and persuasive texts with some complexity of ideas and form
    • view, both collaboratively and independently, to comprehend a variety of visual texts
    • independently select and read, for sustained periods of time, texts for enjoyment and to increase fluency
    • before reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to anticipate content and construct meaning
    • during reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning
    • after reading and viewing, select and use a range of strategies to extend and confirm meaning
    • explain and support personal responses to texts
    • interpret and analyze ideas and information from texts
    • synthesize and extend thinking about texts
    • use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and assess their reading and viewing
    • recognize and explain how structures and features of text shape readers’ and viewers’ construction of meaning
    • demonstrate increasing word skills and vocabulary knowledge

Writing and Representing

English 8 students will be able to:

  • write meaningful personal texts that explore ideas and information
    • write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information
    • write effective imaginative texts to explore ideas and information
    • create thoughtful representations that communicate ideas and information
    • select and use a range of strategies to generate, develop, and organize ideas for writing and representing
    • select and use a range of drafting and composing strategies while writing and representing
    • select and use a range of strategies to revise, edit, and publish writing and representing
    • write and represent to explain and support personal responses to texts
    • write and represent to interpret and analyze ideas and information from texts
    • write and represent to synthesize and extend thinking
    • use metacognitive strategies to reflect on and address their writing and representing
    • use and experiment with elements of style in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry
    • use and experiment with elements of form in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry
    • use conventions in writing and representing, appropriate to purpose and audience, to enhance meaning and artistry

Assessment:

Formative Assessment (Assessment for/as Learning), Student‐Self –Assessment, and Summative Assessment (Assessment of Learning)

Classroom assessment is the process of gathering evidence of what a student knows, understands, and is able to do. It helps to identify students’ learning needs. A central role of assessment in the classroom is to inform teachers’ and students’ actions. The key to improved student performance is an increased attention to strategic applications of formative assessment. While both formative and summative assessment are important, it is formative assessment practices that help students learn to analyze and critique their work and to set personalized goals in relation to shared criteria, thus advancing their learning and achievement. With this increased focus on assessment for and as learning, teachers and students can engage in fewer summative assessments.

More detailed information can be found at the ministry website:
Performance Standards: http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/perf_stands/
Integrated Resource Package: http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/irp_ela.htm


English 8 Honours

English Honours 8 is an enriched course that will require much time, commitment, individual research, and self-directed study.  Students applying for this course are not automatically accepted, but will be selected based on a spring application process in addition to an entrance examination.  Successful applicants will be notified in June.

Students enrolled in the English 8 Honours program will be instructed in the development of their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. This course will focus on proficiency in written expression and oral communication. Students will be expected to read widely and to reflect on their reading through discussion and writing.

Units of Study

Throughout the year, students will engage in the careful reading and analysis of literature. Students will study a work’s style, structure, themes and use of figurative language, symbolism, imagery and tone. In order to aid students in their attempts at understanding, explaining and evaluating literary works, students will be expected to actively participate in class discussions and debates about literature and to use a variety of approaches to writing about literary work.

Literature study includes a range of texts, such as:

  • Short stories – anthology selections with emphasis on literary critical terminology
    Novels – selected from a range of titles (some classics)
    Poetry – selected from various anthologies
    Drama – including the Shakespearean play, Julius Caesar
    Non-fiction – from various sources
    • Composition– Expository and creative

Students will write in a variety of forms and in both formal and informal contexts, learning to take risks in their writing and developing techniques to find and support ideas. Students will be encouraged to enter their writing in various contests.

*Please read the English 8 course description for more information.


English 9

Reading and Viewing

Literal, inferential, and critical comprehension of selected readings will be areas of study.
• recognition and understanding of subtext, including character analysis and motivation
• recognition of text structures/features and context clues to understand unfamiliar      words and expressions
• analysis of literary, informational, and visual texts
• appreciation/enjoyment of fiction and non-fiction

Writing and Representing

Many of the writing activities/assignments will be directly related to the literature studied. Writing will be approached as a process and students will become more familiar with the stages of writing from the development of an idea to finished work. The mechanical aspects of writing (form): punctuation, sentence structure, and spelling will continue to be a focus.
• emphasis on revision and editing (both peer and self)
• expository writing/analysis
• creative writing/reflective writing
• multi-paragraph compositions

Oral Language

Group discussion skills will be addressed and individuals will be called upon to present ideas to small groups and the class in a variety of situations.

  • describing, persuading, and explaining
    • responding to texts critically, personally and creatively
    • conveying and deriving meaning through oral language features
    • acknowledging diversity and respecting the ides of others
    • active listening

Units of Study

  • Novel Study – typically two novel studies
    • Independent Novel Study/ Literature Appreciation – Book Boxes/Lit. Circles
    • Drama – typically includes Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

English 9 Honours

Students enrolled in the English 9 Honours program will be instructed in the development of their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. This course will focus on proficiency in written expression and oral communication. Students will be expected to read widely and to reflect on their reading through discussion and writing.

Units of Study

Throughout the year, students will engage in the careful reading and analysis of literature. Students will study a work’s style, structure, themes and use of figurative language, symbolism, imagery and tone. In order to aid students in their attempts at understanding, explaining and evaluating literary works, students will be expected to actively participate in class discussions and debates about literature and to use a variety of approaches to writing about literary work.

Literature study includes a range of texts, such as:

  • Short stories – anthology selections with emphasis on literary critical terminology
    Novels – selected from a range of titles (some classics)
    Poetry – selected from various anthologies
    Drama – including the Shakespearean play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream
    Non-fiction – from various sources
    Composition: expository and creative

Students will write in a variety of forms and in both formal and informal contexts, learning to take risks in their writing and developing techniques to find and support ideas. Students will be encouraged to enter their writing in various contests.

*Please read the English 9 course description for more information.


English 10

The English 10 curriculum adheres to and follows the prescribed learning outcomes outlined by the B.C. Ministry of Education. It is a provincially examinable course. The classroom portion of the course work counts for 80% of the final mark. The remaining 20% is calculated from the English 10 Provincial Examination which all students in this course will write in June.

Oral Language

Group discussion skills will be addressed and individuals will be called upon to present ideas to small groups and the class in a variety of situations. Learning how to listen for main ideas and details in verbal presentation/instruction will be highlighted.
• imitating and sharing responsibilities
• responding to text personally, critically, and creatively
• demonstrating understanding of diversity
• conveying and deriving meaning through oral language features

Reading and Viewing

Literal, inferential and critical comprehension of selections will be considered. Reading for various purposes and an awareness of studying techniques will be developed. Reading for enjoyment (literature appreciation) will be encouraged and supported while:
• identifying the influence of historical and cultural factors in and on texts
• analyzing and evaluating literary, informational, and visual texts
• constructing meaning using text structures and features
Writing and Representing

Writing will continue to be approached as a process. The content/main idea is key; however, students will also work on the mechanics of writing, such as usage, sentence and paragraph structure, punctuation and spelling. Students will write about both fiction and non-fiction. Paragraph writing will be the main form of expression but the writing of sentences of varying complexity is also part of the curriculum. Multi-paragraph compositions and narrative and descriptive prose will be taught.

Students will demonstrate learning while:

  • creating a variety of written texts – including reflective, creative, critical, and analytical
    • synthesizing and extending thinking
    • using elements of style and form appropriate to purpose and audience

Units of Study

  • Novel study – may include Animal Farm, To Kill A Mockingbird, and/or The
    Chrysalids
    • Independent Novel Study – Book Boxes/Literature Circles
    • Drama – Shakespearean Drama: Romeo and Juliet
    • Short Story – selected from Inside Stories II and other Anthologies
    • Non-fiction – a variety of selections
    • Poetry – a variety of selections
    • Writing – analytical, reflective, and creative compositions

English 10 Honours

English 10 Honours will cover all the requirements of English 10 with enriched components. This course will concentrate on critical approaches to literature such as theme, point of view, atmosphere, and symbolism. Students are expected to participate in discussion and to expand their reading of literature beyond the course material. Suitable candidates for Honours 10 demonstrate a genuine interest in literature.

Units of Study

  • Novel studies – chosen from the following:
    • The Chrysalids
    • To Kill a Mockingbird
    • The Greenies
    • Night
    • Animal Farm
    • The Cage
    • Independent Novel Study – Book Boxes/Literature Circles
    Drama – will be chosen from the following:
    • Romeo and Juliet
    • Julius Caesar
    • King Lear

Short Stories

  • Inside Stories II
    • Anthology selections
    • Non-fiction selections

Poetry – variety of selections
Writing – analytical, reflective, and creative

*Please read the English 10 course description for more information.


Communications 11

Success in this course significantly depends on the student. It is important for the Communications student to make his/her best effort. A positive attitude and a willingness to learn will help make a comfortable classroom environment for everyone. This course will have as its focus a daily emphasis on discussion of assigned readings and a variety of writings in response to that discussion. In addition, there will be units on novels, short stories, myths, poetry and plays. There will also be developmental units in study skills, the use of various resources, the writing process, editing, types of letters, and effective listening and speaking. The work will be evaluated on a daily basis.

Goals and Objectives:

  • to provide an alternative course that meets the needs of students who may find it   difficult to succeed in English 11
    • to provide practical communication skills and experiences for students
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop enjoyment and appreciation of
    literature
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and
    writing skills
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop communication skills consistent with
    the rules of standard English

Units of Study:

  • Evolution of Self – analogies and metaphors
    • Short Stories and Genres in Literature
    • Media, Myth, and Popular Culture
    • Two Novel Studies – typically Speak, Stick Boy, and/or Freedom Writers
    • Poetry
    • Writing – formal, creative and business writing will be taught throughout the school
    year
    • Appreciating Literature (Book Box Selections* and/or Literature Circles)

*independent reading assignments will be given throughout the school year


English 11

English 11 adheres to and follows the prescribed learning outcomes as outlined by the B.C.
Ministry of Education. It is expected that students will:

  • develop and demonstrate effective reading, listening and viewing skills and strategies
    • demonstrate understanding of written, oral and visual communication.
    • identify connections between their own ideas and experiences and a variety of literary   material
    • draw reasoned conclusions from a variety of informational sources
    • apply knowledge of the conventions of language and appropriate usage
    • demonstrate understanding of, and abilities to use, a variety of forms and styles of    communication
    • use language to explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
    • use language to interact and collaborate with others

Units of Study:

Students will be working on their own, in small groups, and with the entire class on a variety of topics and subjects. The following are some of the materials/units which will be completed:

  • Short Story
    • Drama
    • Novel Study
    • Non- fiction
    • Poetry
    • Composition/Writing Skills

Composition 11

Composition 11 is an elective course that sudents take while also enrolled in English 11 or 12.  It is designed to provide students with opportunities to improve upon their writing skills outside of their regular English courses.  This course is especially helpful for, although not exclusively designed for, students who are transitioning out of ESL or have already done so, but are challenged by the level of writing that is expected of them in English 11 or 12.  Readings, class activities and written work will focus on developing paragraph and essay composition and editing skills.

Students will read and discuss various styles and formats of writing in order to identify and explore important elements of essays and different styles of writing.  Students will also learn various strategies and skills for planning, writing, rewriting, peer-editing and editing their own written work.  Students will engage in class activities and exercises to improve upon grammar and sentence structure errors in their writing.

Throughout the year students will both read and compose essays (and paragraphs) of the following styles: narrative, descriptive, comparative, argumentative, literary analysis and research essays.


Communications 12

The success of this course depends on the student. It is important for the Communications student to regularly make his/her best effort. A positive attitude and a willingness to learn will bring positive results.
Communications 12 is a Provincially Examinable course which focuses on the essential language skills students need to function in daily life and the workplace. The classroom portion of the course counts for 60% of the final mark. The remaining 40% is calculated from the Communications 12 Provincial Examination which all students in this course will write in June. Students must successfully complete this course OR English 12 to be eligible for high school graduation.
This course will have as its focus a daily emphasis on discussion of assigned reading and a variety of writing in response to that discussion. In addition, there will be units on novels, short stories, myths, poetry and plays. There will also be developmental units on study skills, use of various resources, the writing process, editing, types of letters, and effective listening and speaking. Preparation for the Provincial Exam will be ongoing. The work students do will be evaluated on a daily basis.

Goals and Objectives:

  • to provide an alternative course that meets the needs of students who may find it
    difficult to succeed in English 12
    • to provide practical communication skills and experiences for students
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop an enjoyment and appreciation of
    literature
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop listening, speaking, reading, and
    writing skills
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop study skills in listening, speaking,
    reading, and writing
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop communication skills consistent
    with the rules of standard English
    • to provide students with opportunities to develop practical skills in business
    communication

Units of Study:

  • Literature Appreciation
    • Novel Study – Book-Box selections
    • Reading – Short Stories, Non-fiction
    • Poetry
    • Exam Preparation
    • Business/Report Writing
    • Essay (Expository Writing)
    • Visual Design
    • Writing Fundamentals – Grammar/Sentence Structure

English 12

The English 12 curriculum adheres to and follows the prescribed learning outcomes outlined by the B.C. Ministry of Education. 60% of a student’s mark will be based on class assignments, tests, and quizzes completed during the course of the school year. The remaining 40% of a student’s final grade is based on the Provincial Examination written in June. Students are expected to:

Oral Language

  • respond to texts personally, critically, and creatively
    • demonstrate understanding of diversity
    • convey and derive meaning through oral language features
    • use language to interact and collaborate with others
    • use language to explain thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences

Reading and Viewing:

  • initiate and share responsibilities
    • analyze and evaluate literary, informational, and visual texts
    • appreciate the writer’s craft by analyzing text structures and features
    • identify and challenge bias, distortion, and contradiction in texts

Writing and Representing:

  • use elements of style and form appropriate to purposes and audience
    • use connections of language that enhance meaning and artistry
    • create a variety of personal, creative, and informational texts
    • create thoughtful responses, evaluating ideas, and synthesizing and extending thinking

Units of Study

Students will work on their own, in small groups, and with the entire class on a variety of topics and subjects. Both formal and informal oral participation will be assessed. Some of the materials or units which may be completed include:

Novel Study

  • Independent Novel Study – Book Boxes and/or Literature Circles
    • Short Story – critical analysis, literary terms/concepts, and appreciation for various
    styles of short prose
    • Drama – may include a Shakespearean Play
    • Poetry – poetic forms, devices, and concepts
    • Non-fiction – selected essays and articles
    • Writing – narrative, expository, descriptive and persuasive essay styles

English 12 First Peoples

English 12 First Peoples is intended for both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal teachers and students. It represents an invitation to all learners to explore and discover First Peoples’ worldviews through the study of literary, informational and media text with local, Canadian and international First Peoples’ content.


English 12 Honours/Advanced Placement

The English Honours Curriculum follows the prescribed learning outcomes outlined for regular English 12, and much of the text material explored in English Honours 12 is the same as that of regular English 12.  Units of study include: Independent Novel Study, Short Stories, Drama, Poetry, and Non-fiction writing.

The Honours 12 programme is designed for students who have a demonstrated interest and understanding of English literature.  Additional/alternate novels, plays, short stories or poems will be examined to develop a broader and deeper understanding of the elements of literature.  The enriched English 12 course allows studentsto work more independently and collaboratively.  Subsequently, students in the English 12 Honours programme have the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of literature through a variety of forms and media.

As with regular English 12, 60% of the final mark will be based on course work, while 40% of the final grade will be based on the Provincial Exam written in June.  Students in English Honours 12 write the same exam as those in regular English 12.

English Honours 12 students have the option of taking the Advanced Placement Exam.  Students who successfully write the exam receive credit for a first year university English course.

*Note – A number of students will have take English Literature 12, or they may be taking the course concurrently with English Honours 12.  Students wishing to write the AP Exam will benefit from having taken both specialized English 12 courses.


Literature 12

English Literature 12 will concentrate on critical approaches to literature. The course will cover drama, novels, short stories, essays, and poetry.  Essay writing and critical and personal responses to literature will also be included in course work. Students are expected to actively participate in discussion and to have a genuine interest in/appreciation for literature. 60% of the final mark will be based on course work. The remaining 40% of the final grade will be based on the Provincial Exam written in June.

Critical and Personal Response to Literature
It is expected that students will:

  • demonstrate an awareness of why literature is valued
    • demonstrate an awareness of the influence of gender, ethnicity, and class on literature
    • demonstrate respect for ideas and values expressed in literary works
    • demonstrate an appreciation of oral and visual performance of literary works

The Literary Tradition of the English Language (Classical to Present)
It is expected that students will:

  • demonstrate knowledge of works within the literary tradition of the English
    language beyond the specified readings
    • demonstrate an awareness of both male and female voices within the literary tradition
    of the English language
    • analyze multiple works of a single author
    • compare the treatments of themes and literary forms

Literary Analysis
It is expected that students will:

  • support a position by providing evidence from literary works
    • recognize the use of key literary terms, devices, and techniques in context
    • identify the distinguishing characteristics of literary genres
    • identify distinguishing characteristics of a writer’s style, such as diction, syntax,
    rhythm imagery

We will cover English literature from Anglo-Saxon and Medieval works to Victorian, 20th Century, and Contemporary texts. We will cover such texts as Beowulf, The Canterbury Tales, Hamlet, and “A Modest Proposal.” We will study 16th Century, 17th Century, 18th Century, Romantic, Victorian, and Modern poets.

Visit the ministry website for more information about Provincial English Exams:

http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/exams/


Creative Writing Course Outline

Course Description:

Students will explore fundamentals of creative writing by writing creative nonfiction, poetry and fiction.  In classroom discussion and small workshops, students will examine their own work and that of others in an attempt to understand what makes a piece of prose or poetry come alive, trying always to apply what has been learned to improve their own writing.  This course will also include practice and exploration in writing for journalistic report on both social and political topics.

Course Objectives:

  • To gain competence in a variety genres.
  • To take risks in order to develop creativity and confidence.
  • To develop authority and purpose in writing.
  • To identify problems and solve them.
  • To write passionately about what we know and care about as well as explore new topics.
  • To go public – to be read by others – in a supportive environment.

Students will keep a journal throughout the course, to be submitted as part of final grade near the end of the course. Entries (maximum: 1 page each) are expected to be made a minimum of twice weekly throughout the course.

* Journals submitted for grading must be computer-printed.

* Hand-written journals will not be accepted.

There will be a workshop participation mark (grade value: 10%).